Monday, December 11, 2017

Extraordinary Moment of Truth in the U.N.

Extraordinary Moment of Truth in the U.N.


Speech at UN Human Rights Council, Sept. 25, 2017:
"Thank you, Mr. President. I take the floor on behalf of UN Watch.
My name is Mosab Hassan Yousef. I grew up in Ramallah as a member of Hamas.

I address my words to the Palestinian Authority, which claims to be the “sole legitimate representative” of the Palestinian people.
I ask: where does your legitimacy come from?
The Palestinian people did not elect you, and they did not appoint you to represent them.
You are self-appointed.
Your accountability is not to your own people. This is evidenced by your total violation of their human rights.
In fact, the Palestinian individual and their human development is the least of your concerns.
You kidnap Palestinian students from campus and torture them in your jails.
You torture your political rivals. The suffering of the Palestinian people is the outcome of your selfish political interests. You are the greatest enemy of the Palestinian people.
If Israel did not exist, you would have no one to blame. Take responsibility for the outcome of your own actions.
You fan the flames of conflict to maintain your abusive power.
Finally, you use this platform to mislead the international community, and to mislead Palestinian society, to believe that Israel is responsible for the problems you create.
Thank you."

Extraordinary Moment of Truth in the U.N.

Extraordinary Moment of Truth in the U.N.


Speech at UN Human Rights Council, Sept. 25, 2017:
"Thank you, Mr. President. I take the floor on behalf of UN Watch.
My name is Mosab Hassan Yousef. I grew up in Ramallah as a member of Hamas.

I address my words to the Palestinian Authority, which claims to be the “sole legitimate representative” of the Palestinian people.
I ask: where does your legitimacy come from?
The Palestinian people did not elect you, and they did not appoint you to represent them.
You are self-appointed.
Your accountability is not to your own people. This is evidenced by your total violation of their human rights.
In fact, the Palestinian individual and their human development is the least of your concerns.
You kidnap Palestinian students from campus and torture them in your jails.
You torture your political rivals. The suffering of the Palestinian people is the outcome of your selfish political interests. You are the greatest enemy of the Palestinian people.
If Israel did not exist, you would have no one to blame. Take responsibility for the outcome of your own actions.
You fan the flames of conflict to maintain your abusive power.
Finally, you use this platform to mislead the international community, and to mislead Palestinian society, to believe that Israel is responsible for the problems you create.
Thank you."

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Centralia, IL: A Brief History – Inescapable Wanderlust

Centralia, IL: A Brief History – Inescapable Wanderlust

Centralia, IL: A Brief History


The following is an edited version of a chapter of my thesis project taking a brief look at the history of my hometown, Centralia, IL. While I knew a lot of what I came across during my research, I also came across a lot that I didn’t know. For those of you who are from the Centralia area, I really encourage you to do some research on the city. There’s an incredible amount of information and history behind the town, some of it incredibly interesting. For those of you not from the Centralia area, I suggest you do some research into your own hometown. You never know what you may dig up, for example, I found out through my research that I grew up within a mile of the largest oil producing fields east of the Mississippi River in the 1940’s. Sure there’s evidence as there’s oil derricks still in the fields today, but I’d have never imagined the magnitude and impact those fields had on the surrounding region.
The Beginning
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Downtown Centralia – Year Unknown
The history of the city begins around 1852, when the Illinois Central Railroad was being developed and laid out. Ground was broken for the railroad in what was later to be called Centralia in 1854. Because accommodations were needed for the men that would be working on the railroad, cottages, cabins, and structures for necessities quickly sprang up close by. The city was later named Centralia in honor of the Illinois Central. As the railroad neared completion numerous types of businesses and services began showing up around the train depot, from churches and doctors, to attorneys and orchards. The State Fair was held in Centralia in 1858, where Abraham Lincoln and Stephan A. Douglas would both attend and make appearances as part of their campaign during the 1858 campaign for U.S. Senator from Illinois. On March 1st , 1859, a charter was adopted and Centralia officially became a city. Elections were set to elect municipal officials. Centralia was an important city during the Civil War. With it being a transportation hub for the region, military men could be trained and easily moved via railroad all over the country. Railroads from Chicago connected to Centralia in 1882 and from Louisville, St. Louis, and Evansville, IN in 1887. As the railroad flourished after it was finished, the coal industry built up steam in the early 1870’s as a seven foot vein of coal was discovered, and an eight foot vein found just a decade later. In 1906, the Central Coal Mining Company organized and a year later, coal was found in their No. 5 shaft.

The City Develops
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Downtown Centralia – 1911
In the early twentieth century, the city began building a modern infrastructure, sewers were built, stone sidewalks were laid, and roads were paved in 1904. Lake Centralia came into existence in 1908 with water filtration systems for the lake by 1924. Fairview Park, which in the past was a fairground, became the city’s first park in 1920 and a pool was installed in 1938. Other recreational opportunities were presented with the establishment of Community Beach in 1927 and the Community Center in 1941, although Community Beach was quickly abandoned by most when the pool at Fairview Park was constructed. Industries and businesses were booming in early to mid-1900’s. The railroad was experiencing a boom and the coal industry increased and peaked during this time as well. Centralia was a producer of numerous products, from nails and envelopes to stoves and candy bars. Business was so good, visitors from all parts of the state came to see the booming town and be entertained. Electric streetcars took the place of horse drawn ones in 1906 and ran to surrounding villages and towns.
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Downtown Centralia – Early 20th Century
Education in Centralia grew tremendously before World War II. The original high school was built in 1904, and a business school and six elementary schools were added before the depression. In 1940, Centralia Township Junior College was established. It would later need to move due to needed expansion and was renamed Kaskaskia Community College in 1967. St. Mary’s Hospital was built in 1909 and led the way in healthcare improvements. Haley’s Eye Infirmary became a cornerstone institution in 1912. Both of these health facilities would be tested in the following decades by the deadly flu epidemic of 1918 and the outburst of tuberculosis. This was the same time frame in which lunch and milk programs were implemented within schools of Centralia. Agriculture flourished around Centralia. The railroads made it easy for farmers to move crops and the soil was great for farming anything from corn to fruit-producing trees. Major producers in the area grew corn, beans, cattle, hogs, apples, peaches, pears, and strawberries, amongst others. Productivity was improved when the University of Illinois experimental farms and Farm Bureau provided leadership in more scientific farming.
The oil boom was most likely the third most important industry in Centralia’s history behind coal, and, of course, the railroad. 1937 was the year it all started, as the Adams Oil and Gas Company discovered oil just northwest of Centralia. By the next year, there were 102 oil-producing wells and 111 drilling operations. The field had produced nearly 300,000 barrels of oil and was producing of over 1,000 barrels per day on just over 1,000 acres. That same summer the focus would shift to the Ed Tate farm just east of Centralia, as the Texas Oil Company struck black gold and struggled to contain the flow. At its peak, Tate farm fields were the largest producer of oil east of the Mississippi River, with almost 2500 wells yielding three hundred thousand barrels of oil per day and over two hundred million cubic feet of natural gas. The oil boom in Centralia brought people from all over the country to the small town. Centralia made over a million and a half dollars from oil revenue. This was put back into the community through a new city hall and new community center. I actually grew up less than a mile from these fields. Citation Oil & Gas, based out of Houston, TX, acquired the fields in 1998 from Texaco. From 2005-07 Citation constructed a gas plant there.
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1940’s Postcard of the Lake Centralia-Salem Oil Fields
Sports in Centralia were very popular in the early twentieth century. Independent and semi-professional baseball teams were abundant from 1867 to 1950. A state championship was captured in 1869 by the Centralia Egyptians and success followed for nearly the next century. In 1947, Centralia received its first professional team, an affiliate of the Chicago Cubs. They were later renamed the Sterlings in 1949 and won pennants in 1949 and 1950. Football was played in 1889, but hardly resembled the game we know today. In 1905, however, there was considerable football action and it more closely resembled the game we know today. Teams of school and non-school participants played games against nearby towns. However, due to lack of safety equipment, Centralia Township High School put an end to the game for twenty years, not to be played again at the high school level again until 1925. Centralia High School has had eight seasons without losses. Although the high school football team has seen its successes in the past, basketball is by far the sport of the city. Centralia High school was credited with being the winningest high school in the nation until the early 1990’s with three state championships and a number of other appearances in the state tournament. The most famous athletes to come from Centralia are Lowell Spurgeon, Dwight, “Dike” Eddleman, Bobby Joe Mason, and Gary Gaetti. Lowell Spurgeon set state records in track and had an amazing football career at the University of Illinois. “Dike” Eddleman is the most famed athlete from Centralia. He held numerous high school state records as well had an amazing football and track career at the University of Illinois, but his Olympic medals are what set him apart from the rest. The University of Illinois’ “Athlete of the Year” award is actually named the “Dike Eddleman Award”. Bobby Joe Mason was a versatile athlete in football, basketball, and track and was a member of the Harlem Globetrotters for years.
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Stained Glass at Old Trout Gym.
Entertainment was plentiful in Centralia. The circus has been popular from the days of the Civil War until today. Traveling entertainment and opera houses were the most popular form of entertainment before the 1900’s. Opera houses remained popular in Centralia, as the Pittenger Grand Opera House was the most elegant theater south of Springfield. A movie theater became popular around the turn of the century with the first moving picture playing at the Pittenger in 1905. The Illinois Theater opened in 1922 with an amazing 1,200 seats. The first talkie was shown at the Illinois Theater in 1929.
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Illinois Theater; Downtown Centralia
Post-War Years
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Former Coke Bottling Plant; Centralia, IL
Housing shortages and rising prices welcomed the servicemen returning home all over the United States, and Centralia was no different. There was much expansion 8 in the 1940s as the first radio broadcast took place. The VFW purchased the Shell building, and new building projects took place, the most popular being the Art Deco style Coca- Cola plant. However, with this continued growth came a disaster. In 1947, the Number 5 Mine collapsed and killed one hundred and eleven miners. This disaster is the second worst mining disaster in the United States since 1940. Soon after the disaster, the Foundation Park system opened featuring a pond, where the Centralia Balloon Fest would later be held. The Centralia Centennial was held in 1953 with much honoring of its past. The town had definitely changed over the course of a century. The 50s and the Centennial brought a number of new items. Telephone dials, parking meters, low cost government housing, and Pittenger Bandshell located behind the new Carnegie Library.
Even with all the new came some disappointment. The city population dropped as unemployment rose due to shops and the mine closing and the oil fields suffering. Even with the suffering of the 1950s, the 1960s saw continuing construction as a number of schools, churches, government facilities, and places to shop continued to be built. A number of famous people visited Centralia. Richard Nixon visited during campaigning years of 1952, ’56, and ’60 as well as Barry Goldwater, Ed Sullivan, and Jimmy Hoffa. The 1970’s saw even more construction and renovation, as the Library added wings, although not without controversy regarding the architectural style, expansions occurred at the Municipal Airport, new construction occurred at the swimming complex at Fairview Park and in downtown Centralia as well as more churches and schools were built.
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Illinois Central Steam Locomotive 2500 Move Day – September 2nd, 1962 – Moved to Fairview Park
In the 1970s, however, there was an increase in crime and drug use. After the murders of two well-known Centralia men, Centralia was named as a site for a new state prison. Streaking was seen on the streets and Ku Klux Klan activity was briefly reported. Desegregation was completed by the end of the decade. The 1980’s and 90’s saw little action, other than Hollywood Brand candy factory, a staple of Centralia producing Paydays since 1937, burned down, the Centralia Orphans basketball team won their 1500th game, the first school in the country to do so, and Centralian Jim Brady, took a bullet for President Ronald Reagan during an assassination attempt. The most important structure built over this time, however, was the Centralia Carillon. The Carillon is the sixth largest in the world, standing at one hundred sixty-five feet it contains sixty-five bells, the largest, known as “Big Tom”, weighs in at eleven hundred pounds and the smallest at twenty pounds. There are shows every Wednesday where a carillonist comes and plays for the public. Centralia has had a number of community traditions and a number of them survive today.
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Centralia Carillon at night
Memorial Day observations have undertaken since 1868, with two different services being done. The Centralia Halloween Parade has been a staple of the city since 1923 with what has become a Mardi Gras flavor with colorful floats, bands, and food. Two traditions have stood the test of time at Centralia High School. The first is May Fete, which was started in 1913 and is an event in which students vote a “Queen of May”. Performances by students are performed in front of the May Fete Court and thousands of community members who attend the event each year. The other high school tradition is the Centralia Holiday Tournament, which is the longest running holiday high school basketball tournament in the state of Illinois. Teams from all over the country, as far as Florida in recent years, have made appearances at the historic tournament. The newest tradition of Centralia is the Hot Air Balloon Fest held at Foundation Park every August. Nearly forty thousand visitors come to the Balloon Fest from all over during the three days it is held. The Balloon Fest’s inaugural year was 1990.
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Trout Gym at the new Centralia High School, which hosts the Holiday Tournament
Today
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Balloon Fest at Foundation Park held in mid-August each year
Centralia has been struggling the past few decades, with a number of businesses and people leaving the town. The population was down to 12,858 in 2012 from 14,136 in 2000, which is a 9.0% decrease over just a twelve year period. The problems began when Illinois Central Railroad began downsizing and laying off employees. Centralia was the division headquarters and at one time employed nearly one thousand people. Today that number is much smaller. After the railroad, coal, and oil industries tapered off, manufacturing companies moved in, and Centralia had bounced back.
By 2000, unemployment was down to 4.4%, lowest in over a decade, however, the good times were short-lived. The emerging global economy has hurt Centralia, as many of the small manufacturing businesses have left town, outsourced to another country. Prime downtown real estate is held by a music store and tattoo parlor. Most other stores are empty. A number of major Centralia employers have left town in recent years. Over three thousand jobs were lost from 2001-2003 when World Color Press, Littelfuse Inc., Sealed Air Corp, Meridian Automotive Systems, and Greif Bros. Corp all closed their doors. Many of the employees at those factories making a decent living were forced to take a job with much less pay or relocate. At this point, unemployment was at 11%, and Marion County had the highest unemployment rate in the state for thirty months. The top employers in Centralia now are St. Mary’s Hospital and Centralia Correctional Center.
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New Centralia High School – Est. 2006
Recently Centralia has seen some new construction. In 2006, a new high school was built as the existing high school was deemed insufficient in a few areas. More recently, a new Super Walmart was recently completed with a new hotel and outlet shops also planned near the site. A new coffee shop, The Rail, also just opened its doors downtown. Centralia has the opportunity to remake itself as a young, artistic community if only they can embrace that image and work toward providing opportunities.

Saturday, December 9, 2017

African-Americans Infuriated Over ‘Racist’ Anti-Roy Moore Flyer Released by Democrat Opponent

African-Americans Infuriated Over ‘Racist’ Anti-Roy Moore Flyer Released by Democrat Opponent

African-Americans Infuriated Over ‘Racist’ Anti-Roy Moore Flyer Released by Democrat Opponent


Democrat candidate for Senate Doug Jones has received a lot of criticism for his inappropriate advertisement meant for African-Americans.Jones’ campaign issued a flyer in order to attract black voters while attacking the Republican opponent Roy Moore for the accusations of sexual misconduct.

“Think if a black man went after high school girls anyone would try to make him a senator?” says the flyer that many find to be racist.
The inappropriate flyer was meant to encourage African-American voters not to vote for Moore, suggesting that if a black man was accused of such behavior he couldn’t win the election.
The black community is an electorate Jones needs to win the Alabama special Senate election.
“I feel it was putting you in a position to vote based on race, versus the correct candidate, or a candidate,” Alabama resident Veronica Jones said.
She says the ad was not the right way to appeal the Alabama’s black community, saying “Just state the facts, what are you going to do for that target area, and be done.”
Many African-Americans criticized the ad.
The Root, a magazine mainly about African-American culture, published an article attacking Jones’ ad.
“Someone, probably a white man, thought that the image would resonate with black people and motivate them to get out the vote,” wrote The Root’s Michael Harriot. “The flyer is reductive in its oversimplification of the black mind as only caring about black issues. While it might not be racist, it is certainly racist adjacent.”
Harriot also said that his move was typical for national Democrats.
“Part of the reason the Democratic Party has been marginalized as a party that only exists on the coasts and in urban areas is white-mannery like this.”
Moore faced accusations from several women last month about alleged sexual misbehavior with a minor, occurrences that allegedly happened 40 years ago. He denied those allegations.
Several polls show that Moore is in the lead, Real Clear Politics poll says Moore is leading Jones by 2.3 points and Strategy Research poll released on Dec 4. revealed that Moore is ahead of Jones by 7-points.

This tax deal will make America more prosperous


This tax deal will make America more prosperous


Congress is now in the final wrestling match stage of creating a $1.5 trillion tax reform package. House and Senate Republicans must resolve differences in their bills in order to hand completed legislation to President Donald Trump.
You know Republicans want to get the deal done, and you know Trump will sign what Congress delivers. This has been a weird, ugly year — long on political drama and short on legislative accomplishments. The GOP needs to prove it can govern. If a Republican-controlled Congress and Republican president can’t fulfill a promise to cut taxes, what can they accomplish?
The rest of us care about outcomes, not crowing. Good tax reform should make a complex economy more efficient and ultimately put money in people’s pockets. Some tax deals go heavy on benefiting individuals. This legislation does some of that. But the larger opportunity is on the business side, providing relief and investment incentives to employers. Therefore, our focus is on whether this bill reshapes tax policy in a way that helps Americans become more prosperous by spurring job and wage growth. We believe this tax reform bill will strengthen the American economy and create wealth, so we support passage.
These massive tax reform packages don’t come around often. They are too difficult. The last big change came in 1986 under President Ronald Reagan, back when it was practically fashionable for lawmakers to do big deals across the aisle. This time Democrats stand in opposition as, for example, Republicans stood against Obamacare. Still, the country is weighing an epochal change to the economy, making this “an incredibly significant time in our public life,” U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam, one of the Republican tax reform leaders, tells us.
Any vote against this bill is a vote to maintain America as it looks today. Are you happy with the state of the economy since the end of the Great Recession eight years ago? You shouldn’t be. First, discard the impact of the stock market boom fattening your 401(k) since Trump’s election, because that’s due in part to anticipation of tax reform. Kill tax reform and you lose market momentum.
What you’re left with is what this nation has had: growth around 2 percent or less a year. That’s not fast enough to boost stagnant wages, increase the job participation rate or improve U.S. competitiveness vs. other countries. Passing this tax reform should get the economy to steady 3 percent growth. At that rate, the country generates trillions of dollars of new economic activity, creates jobs and increases household income – money to be spent or saved.
The tax bill helps employers by lowering the top U.S. corporate tax rate from 35 percent to about 20 percent. The final rate hasn’t been set, but it will be more in line with those of other nations. The bill also takes a big step to encourage companies to repatriate more than $2 trillion in profits that are parked overseas to avoid that 35 percent rate. Companies would get a chance to bring cash home at a one-time rate of about 14 percent. With those changes, companies will invest to grow. Without those changes, U.S. companies are more likely to move out of the country or be acquired by foreign entities.
Another provision of the tax bill encourages companies to buy more equipment by allowing them to immediately and fully expense the cost. Business investment is a big deal because, with a lower marginal tax rate, businesses can spend big to improve or expand their operations. And if XYZ Co. buys more trucks, it needs more drivers.
Our major concern with this bill is the cost. This plan may cost the government $1.5 trillion over a decade in which the Congressional Budget Office expects Washington to collect $43 trillion in revenue if the economy continues on its current, slow-growth trajectory. If economic growth rises to about 2.5 percent annually, this package could pay for itself. If it doesn’t, the nation’s $20 trillion debt would rise accordingly. Tax reform, then, is an investment in the economy. As Roskam puts it, “We’re buying an updated tax code and faster growth.”
One thing we hope that faster growth buys us all is a new national discussion about how to curtail spending and reduce the debt. The country can’t live by one side of the ledger. Eventually, revenue and expenditure need to come into alignment.

CFPB Reportedly Funneled Billions Into "Secret Democrat Slush Fund", Consultant Claims

CFPB Reportedly Funneled Billions Into "Secret Democrat Slush Fund", Consultant Claims 

CFPB Reportedly Funneled Billions Into "Secret Democrat Slush Fund", Consultant Claims

Tyler Durden's picture
A consultant who worked with the highly politicized Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) claims the organization funneled a large portion of over $5 billion in collected penalties to "community organizers aligned with Democrats" as part of a giant slush fund, the Post reports.
[The CFPB] Funneled a large portion of the more than $5 billion in penalties collected from defendants to community organizers aligned with Democrats — “a slush fund by another name,” said a consultant who worked with CFPB on its Civil Penalty Fund and requested anonymity.

Created six years ago as the brainchild of Senator Elizabeth Warren and slipped into the Dodd Frank bill before it was passed by Congressional Democrats, the CFPB became one of the most powerful agencies in D.C., with the ability to exercise enormous power over the U.S. economy while its budget remained unencumbered by congressional oversight. As one Hill writer put it:
The problem is that this agency and its director were set up to be free from the control of the Congress. Congress’s fundamental obligation to oversee and fund such bureaus or agencies is short-circuited when it comes to the CFPB. In structuring it in the manner written by now-Sen. Warren (D-Mass.), the law abrogated the idea of a government by the people, for the people and of the people.

Instead, it established an autocratic and unaccountable power center for people of Warren’s ideological persuasion — those who view our market economy as an enemy that must be managed by a chosen few. The creation of the CFPB as a rogue agency with a dictatorial leader is one of the most significant acts of malfeasance perpetrated on the American constitutional system since the Sedition Acts of 1798. 
The reins of the CFPB were handed over to Trump appointee Mick Mulvaney last week following the resignation of Director Richard Cordray, but not before Deputy Director Leandra English's unsuccessful attempt to block Mulvaney's appointment in a complaint filed against Trump and Mulvaley in a DC court.
After a Federal judge ruled that Mulvaney is now acting director of the CFPB - his first order of business was to institute a 30-day freeze on all new hiring and regulations.
Both President Trump and Mick Mulvaney have had strong opinions about the CFPB in the past, with Mulvaney saying “It is a completely unaccountable agency, and I think that’s wrong,” and adding “If the law allowed this place not to exist, I’d sit down with the president to try to make the case that other agencies can do this job well if not more effectively.” Mulvaney also called the agency "a sad, sick joke."
Aside from the $5 billion "slush fund" detailed in the Post, the CFPB has also engaged in the following:
  • Bounced business owners and industry reps from secret meetings it’s held with Democrat operatives, radical civil-rights activists, trial lawyers and other “community advisers,” according to a report by the House Financial Services Committee.
  • Retained GMMB, the liberal advocacy group that created ads for the Obama and Hillary Clinton presidential campaigns, for more than $40 million, making the Democrat shop the sole recipient of CFPB’s advertising expenditure, Rubin says.
  • Met behind closed doors to craft financial regulatory policy with notorious bank shakedown groups who have taken hundreds of thousands of dollars in federal grant money to gin up housing and lending discrimination complaints, which in turn are fed back to CFPB, according to Investor’s Business Daily and Judicial Watch.
Moreover, the CFPB secretly assembled several massive consumer databases which raise privacy and corporate liability concerns. "One sweeps up personal credit card information and another compiles data on as many as 230 million mortgage applicants focusing on “race” and “ethnicity.”" reports The Hill. Another database contains over 900,000 unvetted grievances against financial companies, points out Alan Kaplinsky, lead regulatory attorney for Ballard Spahr LLP.
Think a database of google's depth, but used solely by the government.
In this context, Mick Mulvaney appears to be the right tool for the President's vow to "put the regulations industry out of business," which he says will lead to higher employment and higher wages.
“If you’re wondering about his commitment to deregulation, don’t,” Mulvaney said in front of a libertarian gathering a few months ago, “because this is one of the things he pounds on again and again and again.”

46 Quotes On Population Control From World Leaders That Will Chill You To The Bone

46 Quotes On Population Control From World Leaders That Will Chill You To The Bone 

46 Quotes On Population Control From World Leaders That Will Chill You To The Bone


Overpopulation is a myth. I won’t go into detail in this particular post, but you can watch the videos on the last page for a good overall explanation as to why our world is not falling to the ‘human plague’.  I suggest you do your own research, it doesn’t take much investigation to see the man behind the curtain.
The following are 46 population control quotes that show just how badly the global elite want to wipe us all out…
1. Charles Darwin (his thinking is at the foundation of so many of our scientific theories today): “At some future period, not very distant as measured by centuries, the civilised races of man will almost certainly exterminate and replace throughout the world the savage races. At the same time the anthropomorphous apes, as Professor Schaaffhausen has remarked, will no doubt be exterminated. The break will then be rendered wider, for it will intervene between man in a more civilised state as we may hope, than the Caucasian and some ape as low as a baboon, instead of as at present between the negro or Australian and the gorilla.”
2. Bill Gates: “The problem is that the population is growing the fastest where people are less able to deal with it. So it’s in the very poorest places that you’re going to have a tripling in population by 2050. (…) And we’ve got to make sure that we help out with the tools now so that they don’t have an impossible situation later.”
3. UK Television Presenter Sir David Attenborough: “We are a plague on the Earth. It’s coming home to roost over the next 50 years or so. It’s not just climate change; it’s sheer space, places to grow food for this enormous horde. Either we limit our population growth or the natural world will do it for us, and the natural world is doing it for us right now”
4. UN Under-Secretary-General Baroness Valerie Amos: “Population growth puts increased pressure on everything else…Girls and women must be educated. Even a few years’ basic education leads to smaller families.”
5. Paul Ehrlich, a former science adviser to president George W. Bush and the author of “The Population Bomb”: “Solving the population problem is not going to solve the problems of racism… of sexism… of religious intolerance… of war… of gross economic inequality. But if you don’t solve the population problem, you’re not going to solve any of those problems. Whatever problem you’re interested in, you’re not going to solve it unless you also solve the population problem.”
6. Dave Foreman, the co-founder of Earth First: “We humans have become a disease, the Humanpox.”
7. CNN Founder Ted Turner: “A total world population of 250-300 million people, a 95% decline from present levels, would be ideal.”
8. Japan’s Deputy Prime Minister Taro Aso about medical patients with serious illnesses: “You cannot sleep well when you think it’s all paid by the government. This won’t be solved unless you let them hurry up and die.”
9. David Rockefeller: “The negative impact of population growth on all of our planetary ecosystems is becoming appallingly evident.”
10. Richard Branson: “The truth is this: the Earth cannot provide enough food and fresh water for 10 billion people, never mind homes, never mind roads, hospitals and schools.”
11. Environmental activist Roger Martin: “On a finite planet, the optimum population providing the best quality of life for all, is clearly much smaller than the maximum, permitting bare survival. The more we are, the less for each; fewer people mean better lives.”
12. HBO personality Bill Maher: “I’m pro-choice, I’m for assisted suicide, I’m for regular suicide, I’m for whatever gets the freeway moving – that’s what I’m for. It’s too crowded, the planet is too crowded and we need to promote death.”
13. Al Gore: “One of the things we could do about it is to change the technologies, to put out less of this pollution, to stabilize the population, and one of the principal ways of doing that is to empower and educate girls and women. You have to have ubiquitous availability of fertility management so women can choose how many children to have, the spacing of the children… You have to educate girls and empower women. And that’s the most powerful leveraging factor, and when that happens, then the population begins to stabilize and societies begin to make better choices and more balanced choices.”
14. MIT professor Penny Chisholm: “The real trick is, in terms of trying to level off at someplace lower than that 9 billion, is to get the birthrates in the developing countries to drop as fast as we can. And that will determine the level at which humans will level off on earth.”
15. Julia Whitty, a columnist for Mother Jones: “The only known solution to ecological overshoot is to decelerate our population growth faster than it’s decelerating now and eventually reverse it—at the same time we slow and eventually reverse the rate at which we consume the planet’s resources. Success in these twin endeavors will crack our most pressing global issues: climate change, food scarcity, water supplies, immigration, health care, biodiversity loss, even war. On one front, we’ve already made unprecedented strides, reducing global fertility from an average 4.92 children per woman in 1950 to 2.56 today—an accomplishment of trial and sometimes brutally coercive error, but also a result of one woman at a time making her individual choices. The speed of this childbearing revolution, swimming hard against biological programming, rates as perhaps our greatest collective feat to date.”

Depopulation as a conspiracy theory sure seems to move out of the realm of ‘theory’ when you look at the vast number of world leaders calling for it.

16. Colorado State University Professor Philip Cafaro in a paper entitled “Climate Ethics and Population Policy”: “Ending human population growth is almost certainly a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for preventing catastrophic global climate change. Indeed, significantly reducing current human numbers may be necessary in order to do so. 17. Professor of Biology at the University of Texas at Austin Eric R. Pianka: “I do not bear any ill will toward people. However, I am convinced that the world, including all humanity, WOULD clearly be much better off without so many of us.”
18. Kofi Annan, UN Secretary-General from 1997-2006: “The idea that population growth guarantees a better life — financially or otherwise — is a myth that only those who sell nappies, prams and the like have any right to believe.”
19. Thoraya Ahmed Obaid, UN Under-Secretary-General from 2000-2010: “We cannot confront the massive challenges of poverty, hunger, disease and environmental destruction unless we address issues of population and reproductive health.”
20. Detroit News Columnist Nolan Finley: “Since the national attention is on birth control, here’s my idea: If we want to fight poverty, reduce violent crime and bring down our embarrassing drop-out rate, we should swap contraceptives for fluoride in Michigan’s drinking water.
We’ve got a baby problem in Michigan. Too many babies are born to immature parents who don’t have the skills to raise them, too many are delivered by poor women who can’t afford them, and too many are fathered by sorry layabouts who spread their seed like dandelions and then wander away from the consequences.”
21. John Guillebaud, professor of family planning at University College London: “The effect on the planet of having one child less is an order of magnitude greater than all these other things we might do, such as switching off lights. An extra child is the equivalent of a lot of flights across the planet.”
22. Pope Francis: “Some people think that — excuse my expression here — that in order to be good Catholics we have to be like rabbits. No. Parenthood is about being responsible. This is clear.”
23. Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama 1950-present: “The growth in population is very much bound up with poverty, and in turn poverty plunders the Earth. When human groups are dying of hunger, they eat everything: grass, insects, everything. They cut down the trees, they leave the land dry and bare. All other concerns vanish. That’s why in the next 30 years the problems we call ‘environmental’ will be the hardest that humanity has to face.”
24. Democrat strategist Steven Rattner: “WE need death panels. Well, maybe not death panels, exactly, but unless we start allocating health care resources more prudently — rationing, by its proper name — the exploding cost of Medicare will swamp the federal budget.”
25. Matthew Yglesias, a business and economics correspondent for Slate, in an article entitled “The Case for Death Panels, in One Chart”: “But not only is this health care spending on the elderly the key issue in the federal budget, our disproportionate allocation of health care dollars to old people surely accounts for the remarkable lack of apparent cost effectiveness of the American health care system. When the patient is already over 80, the simple fact of the matter is that no amount of treatment is going to work miracles in terms of life expectancy or quality of life.”
26. Planned Parenthood Founder Margaret Sanger: “All of our problems are the result of overbreeding among the working class”
27. Gloria Steinem: “Everybody with a womb doesn’t have to have a child any more than everybody with vocal chords has to be an opera singer.”
28. Jane Goodall: “It’s our population growth that underlies just about every single one of the problems that we’ve inflicted on the planet. If there were just a few of us, then the nasty things we do wouldn’t really matter and Mother Nature would take care of it — but there are so many of us.”
29. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: “Frankly I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.”
30. Planned Parenthood Founder Margaret Sanger: “The most merciful thing that the large family does to one of its infant members is to kill it.”

Of course, when it comes to depopulation, the people calling for it don’t include themselves! Why not lead by example? The rest of the world would like to see you set an example…

31. Salon columnist Mary Elizabeth Williams in an article entitled “So What If Abortion Ends Life?”: “All life is not equal. That’s a difficult thing for liberals like me to talk about, lest we wind up looking like death-panel-loving, kill-your-grandma-and-your-precious-baby storm troopers. Yet a fetus can be a human life without having the same rights as the woman in whose body it resides.”
32. Paul Ehrlich: “Basically, then, there are only two kinds of solutions to the population problem. One is a ‘birth rate solution,’ in which we find ways to lower the birth rate. The other is a ‘death rate solution,’ in which ways to raise the death rate — war, famine, pestilence — find us.”
33. Alberto Giubilini of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia and Francesca Minerva of the University of Melbourne in a paper published in the Journal of Medical Ethics: “[W]hen circumstances occur after birth such that they would have justified abortion, what we call after-birth abortion should be permissible. … [W]e propose to call this practice ‘after-birth abortion’, rather than ‘infanticide,’ to emphasize that the moral status of the individual killed is comparable with that of a fetus … rather than to that of a child.  Therefore, we claim that killing a newborn could be ethically permissible in all the circumstances where abortion would be. Such circumstances include cases where the newborn has the potential to have an (at least) acceptable life, but the well-being of the family is at risk.”
34. Nina Fedoroff, a key adviser to Hillary Clinton: “We need to continue to decrease the growth rate of the global population; the planet can’t support many more people.”
35. Barack Obama’s primary science adviser, John P. Holdren: “A program of sterilizing women after their second or third child, despite the relatively greater difficulty of the operation than vasectomy, might be easier to implement than trying to sterilize men.
The development of a long-term sterilizing capsule that could be implanted under the skin and removed when pregnancy is desired opens additional possibilities for coercive fertility control. The capsule could be implanted at puberty and might be removable, with official permission, for a limited number of births.”
36. David Brower, the first Executive Director of the Sierra Club: “Childbearing [should be] a punishable crime against society, unless the parents hold a government license … All potential parents [should be] required to use contraceptive chemicals, the government issuing antidotes to citizens chosen for childbearing.”
37. Maurice Strong: “Either we reduce the world’s population voluntarily or nature will do this for us, but brutally.”
38. Thomas Ferguson, former official in the U.S. State Department Office of Population Affairs: “There is a single theme behind all our work–we must reduce population levels. Either governments do it our way, through nice clean methods, or they will get the kinds of mess that we have in El Salvador, or in Iran or in Beirut. Population is a political problem. Once population is out of control, it requires authoritarian government, even fascism, to reduce it…”
39. Mikhail Gorbachev: “We must speak more clearly about sexuality, contraception, about abortion, about values that control population, because the ecological crisis, in short, is the population crisis. Cut the population by 90% and there aren’t enough people left to do a great deal of ecological damage.”
40. Jacques Costeau: “In order to stabilize world population, we must eliminate 350,000 people per day. It is a horrible thing to say, but it is just as bad not to say it.”
41. Television personality Kate Humble: “There are far too many people in the world…I think one of the most environmentally friendly things you can do is not to have children.”
42. Finnish environmentalist Pentti Linkola: “If there were a button I could press, I would sacrifice myself without hesitating if it meant millions of people would die”
43. Author Dan Brown: “Overpopulation is an issue so profound that all of us need to ask what should be done.”
44. Prince Phillip, husband of Queen Elizabeth II and co-founder of the World Wildlife Fund: “In the event that I am reincarnated, I would like to return as a deadly virus, in order to contribute something to solve overpopulation.”
45. Ashley Judd: “It’s unconscionable to breed, with the number of children who are starving to death in impoverished countries.”
46. Charles Darwin: “With savages, the weak in body or mind are soon eliminated; and those that survive commonly exhibit a vigorous state of health. We civilised men, on the other hand, do our utmost to check the process of elimination; we build asylums for the imbecile, the maimed, and the sick; we institute poor-laws; and our medical men exert their utmost skill to save the life of every one to the last moment. There is reason to believe that vaccination has preserved thousands, who from a weak constitution would formerly have succumbed to small-pox. Thus the weak members of civilised societies propagate their kind. No one who has attended to the breeding of domestic animals will doubt that this must be highly injurious to the race of man. It is surprising how soon a want of care, or care wrongly directed, leads to the degeneration of a domestic race; but excepting in the case of man himself, hardly any one is so ignorant as to allow his worst animals to breed.”